As an E-REV, the Converj would be something of a cross between an electric car and a hybrid. It would be able to operate on battery power alone for up to 40 miles at highway speed, but carry a small gasoline engine that would activate when the batteries were low, giving the Converj the same range as a conventional, gasoline-powered car. Since GM chose to show the car as a Cadillac product, it would likely be appointed as a luxury car and command a price premium over its Volt sibling, but details are scarce.
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That question may soon be asked of GM when it comes to its Voltec technology, the lithium-ion battery system powering the soon to be released Chevrolet Volt sedan. GM has made it plain that the Volt will not be the only product utilizing its latest electric technology, with several models developed to do just that.
Cadillac Canceled
At one point, GM appeared to be committed to building the Cadillac Converj, a stylish coupe based on Voltec. That won't happen and probably for two reasons: the Converj would have competed with the CTS coupe and GM appears ready to roll out a hybrid replacement for its larger STS and DTS sedans.
Cadillac will get a Voltec model, but not just yet.
So, where will Voltec appear? Opel and Buick (China) are two additional areas where the technology will roll out. But as auto trends change, you may see Voltec appear as follows:

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which may cost up to $40,000

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